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Monitoring Performance with Spring AOP

06.23.2012
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If you are using Spring to access/configure resources (DAOs/services), then you might as well add some basic performance monitoring while you are at it.  This is a trivial task with Spring AOP and doesn't require any changes to existing code, just some simple configuration. 

First, you need to include the spring-aop, aspectj and cglib libraries.  If you are using Maven, simply include the following dependencies...

        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.aspectj</groupId>
            <artifactId>aspectjweaver</artifactId>
            <version>1.5.4</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>cglib</groupId>
            <artifactId>cglib-nodep</artifactId>
            <version>2.2</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
          <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
          <artifactId>spring-aop</artifactId>
          <version>2.5.6</version>
        </dependency>

Next, identify what needs monitoring and put the AOP hooks in place.  Generally, this just requires adding a pointcut and advisor configuration in your existing Spring XML configuration file.  This configuration will add method response time logging to all methods in the "com.mycompany.services" package.  Note: these classes must be instantiated with the Spring context...otherwise, the AOP hooks will not be executed.

    <bean id="performanceMonitor"
              class="org.springframework.aop.interceptor.PerformanceMonitorInterceptor" />

    <aop:config>
        <aop:pointcut id="allServiceMethods" expression="execution(* com.mycompany.services.*.*(..))"/>
        <aop:advisor pointcut-ref="allServiceMethods" advice-ref="performanceMonitor" order="2"/>
    </aop:config>

Next, you need to setup your logging (log4j, etc) to enable TRACE on the interceptor class.

    <logger name="org.springframework.aop.interceptor.PerformanceMonitorInterceptor" additivity="false">
        <level value="TRACE"/>
        <appender-ref ref="STDOUT"/>
    </logger>

That's it, now when you run your application, you will see the following logging...

TRACE PerformanceMonitorInterceptor  - StopWatch 'PerfTestService.processRequest': running time (millis) = 1322
TRACE PerformanceMonitorInterceptor  - StopWatch 'PerfTestService.processRequest': running time (millis) = 98
TRACE PerformanceMonitorInterceptor  - StopWatch 'PerfTestService.processRequest': running time (millis) = 1764

This is a some great raw data, but unfortunately is not very useful on its own.  Its for every method call and doesn't provide any other stats.  This quickly clutters up the log and without some way to process/aggregate the log entries, its hard to make sense out of it.  So, unless you plan of writing some log parsing or using 3rd party software (like Splunk or Cati), then you really should do some processing of the data before writing it to the log file.


One easy way to do this is to just write a simple interceptor class to use instead of the Spring default one (PerformanceMonitorInterceptor).  Below is an example of this that provides periodic stats (last, average and greatest response time) as well as warning whenever a method response time exceeds a configured threshold.

By default, it will log stats every 10 method calls and log a warning message anytime a method response time exceeds 1000ms.

public class PerfInterceptor implements MethodInterceptor {

     Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(PerfInterceptor.class.getName());
    private static ConcurrentHashMap<String, MethodStats> methodStats = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, MethodStats>();
    private static long statLogFrequency = 10;
    private static long methodWarningThreshold = 1000;
   
    public Object invoke(MethodInvocation method) throws Throwable {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        try {
            return method.proceed();
        }
        finally {
            updateStats(method.getMethod().getName(),(System.currentTimeMillis() - start));
        }
    }

    private void updateStats(String methodName, long elapsedTime) {
        MethodStats stats = methodStats.get(methodName);
        if(stats == null) {
            stats = new MethodStats(methodName);
            methodStats.put(methodName,stats);
        }
        stats.count++;
        stats.totalTime += elapsedTime;
        if(elapsedTime > stats.maxTime) {
            stats.maxTime = elapsedTime;
        }
       
        if(elapsedTime > methodWarningThreshold) {
            logger.warn("method warning: " + methodName + "(), cnt = " + stats.count + ", lastTime = " + elapsedTime + ", maxTime = " + stats.maxTime);
        }
       
        if(stats.count % statLogFrequency == 0) {
            long avgTime = stats.totalTime / stats.count;
            long runningAvg = (stats.totalTime-stats.lastTotalTime) / statLogFrequency;
            logger.debug("method: " + methodName + "(), cnt = " + stats.count + ", lastTime = " + elapsedTime + ", avgTime = " + avgTime + ", runningAvg = " + runningAvg + ", maxTime = " + stats.maxTime);
           
            //reset the last total time
            stats.lastTotalTime = stats.totalTime;   
        }
    }
   
    class MethodStats {
        public String methodName;
        public long count;
        public long totalTime;
        public long lastTotalTime;
        public long maxTime;
       
        public MethodStats(String methodName) {
            this.methodName = methodName;
        }
    } 
}

Now, you just need to wire this into your app by referencing this class in your Spring xml and logging config.  When you run your app, you will see stats like this...

WARN  PerfInterceptor - method warning: processRequest(), cnt = 10, lastTime = 1072, maxTime = 1937
TRACE PerfInterceptor - method: processRequest(), cnt = 10, lastTime = 1072, avgTime = 1243, runningAvg = 1243, maxTime = 1937
WARN  PerfInterceptor - method warning: processRequest(), cnt = 20, lastTime = 1466, maxTime = 1937
TRACE PerfInterceptor - method: processRequest(), cnt = 20, lastTime = 1466, avgTime = 1067, runningAvg = 892, maxTime = 1937

As you can see, these stats can provide valuable feedback about class/method performance with very little effort and without modifying any existing Java code.  This information can easily be used to find bottlenecks in your application (generally database or threading related, etc)...good luck

Published at DZone with permission of Ben O' Day, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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