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Apache Cassandra Gets Commercial Support

04.27.2010
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The data storage solution for Facebook, Twitter, and Digg, and the clear leader in DZone's NoSQL Poll, Apache Cassandra, is now commercially supported.  The new startup providing the support, Riptano, is founded by Matt Pfeil and Jonathan Ellis - former Cassandra developers at Rackspace.

Cassandra is well-known for having no single point of failure, but one problem that users encounter sometimes is the learning curve.  Some businesses don't have time to learn Cassandra on their own, which is why many have contacted Rackspace, their hosting provider, to ask about Cassandra.  Because Rackspace is currently focused on their hosting business, they didn't want to provide direct commercial support for Cassandra.  

Enter Riptano - a company with funding from Rackspace and a direct line to the Cassandra project at Apache (through Ellis, who is the project chair).  The startup offers professional services, training, and three levels of support.  The bronze level ($995/node per year) offers 24 hour response time and 4 hours of consultation.  Silver ($1,995/node per year) offers 4 hour response time and 16 hours of consultation.  Gold ($3,995/node per year) provides 1 hour response times, 24 hours of consultation, and a special line for phone support.  Pricing for 20 or more servers is negotiated with the company.  Riptano's training service covers installation, configuration, tuning, troubleshooting, and application design.

Riptano also has plans for other Cassandra-supporting technologies.  The Twitter case serves as an example for why Cassandra migration technology is needed; so that roll-your-own migrations are not required when a company is suffering from scalability issues.  This functionality will complement the overall plan of having a commercial distro of Cassandra with enterprise features (not a fork).  The best part about this is that some of those high-end features will probably come back into the open source project. 

In the meantime, the core Cassandra project continues moving forward.  Earlier this month the 0.6 version was released, adding support for Hadoop.  In three to four months, we'll see the release of Cassandra 0.7, which will include secondary index support.