William Vambenepe works are architect in the Application and Middleware management group at Oracle. He blogs at http://stage.vambenepe.com/ William has posted 55 posts at DZone. View Full User Profile

A new SPIN on enriching a model with domain knowledge (constraints and inferences)

01.13.2009
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Back when I was at HP and we got involved with what turned into SML (now a W3C candidate recommendation), we tried to make a case for the specification to be based on RDF/OWL rather than XML/XSD/Schematron. It was a strange situation from a technical perspective because RDF is a better foundation for an IT model than XML, but on the other hand XSD/Schematron is a better choice for validation than OWL. OWL is focused on inference, not validation (because of both fundamental design choices, e.g. the open world assumption, and language expressiveness limitations).

So our options were to either use the right way to represent the system (RDF) combined with the wrong way to capture constraints (OWL) or to use the wrong way to represent the system (XML) combined with the right way to constrain it (mostly Schematron, with some limited help from XSD). At the end, of course, this subtle technical debate was crushed under the steamroller of vendor politics and RDF never got a fair chance anyway.

The point of this little background story is to describe the context in which I read this announcement from Holger Knublauch of TopQuadrant: the new version of their TopBraid Composer tool introduces SPIN, a way to complement OWL with a SPARQL-based constraint checking and inference mechanism.

This relates to SML in two ways.

First, there are similarities in the approach: Schematron leverages the XPath language, used to query XML, to create validation rules. SML then marries Schematron with XSD, for a more powerful validation mechanism. Compare this to SPIN: SPIN leverages the SPARQL query language, used to query RDF, to create validation/inference rules. SPIN also marries this with OWL, for a more powerful validation/inference mechanism.

But beyond the mirroring structures of SPIN and SML, the most interesting thing is that it looks like SPIN could nicely solve the conundrum, described above, of RDF being the right foundation for modeling IT systems but OWL being the wrong constraint mechanism. SPIN may do a better job than SML at what SML is aiming to do (validation rules). And at the same time, you get “for free” (or as close to “for free” as you can get with software, which is still far from “free”) a pretty powerful inference mechanism. The most powerful I know of, short of using a general programming language to capture your inference rules (and good luck with maintaining these rules).

This may sound like sci-fi, but it’s the next logical step for IT configuration standardization. Let’s look at where we are today:

  • SML (at W3C) is an attempt to standardize the expression of constraints.
  • CMDBf (at DMTF) is standardizing how the model content is queried (and, to some limited extent at this point, federated).
  • And recently IBM authored a proposal for a reconciliation specification for items in the model and sent it to an Eclipse group (COSMOS).

But once you tackle reconciliation, you are already half-way into inferencing territory. At least if you want to reconcile between models, not just between instances expressed in the same model. Because the models may not be defined at the same level of granularity, and before you can reconcile items you need to infer finer-grained entities in your coarser-grained model (or vice-versa) so that you can reconcile apples with apples.

Today, inferencing for IT models is done as part of the “discovery packs” that you can buy along with your IT management model repository. But not very well, in general. Because the way you write such a discovery module for the HP Universal CMDB is very different from how you write it for the BMC CMDB, IBM’s CCMDB or as a plug-in for Oracle Enterprise Manager or Microsoft System Center. Not to mention the smaller, more specialized, players. As a result, there is little incentive for 3rd party domain experts to put the work into capture inference rules since the work cannot be widely leveraged.

I am going a bit off-topic here, but one interesting thing about standardization of inferencing for IT management, if it happens, is that it is going to be very hard to not use RDF, OWL and some flavor of SPARQL (SPIN or equivalent) there. And once you do that, the XML-based constraint mechanisms (SML or others) are going to be in for a rough ride. After resisting the RDF stack for constraints, queries and basic reconciliation (because the added value was supposedly not “worth the cost” for each of these separately), the XML dam might get a crack for inferencing. And once RDF starts to trickle through that crack, the whole dam is going to come down in a big wave. Just to be clear, this is a prophetic long-term vision, not a prediction for 2009 (unfortunately).

In the meantime, I’d like to take this SPIN feature a… spin (sorry) when I find some time. We’ll see if I can install the new beta of TopBraid composer despite having used up, a year ago, my evaluation license of the earlier version of the product. Despite what I had hopped at some point, this is not directly applicable to my current work, so I am not sure I want to buy a license. But who knows, SPIN may turn out to be the change that eventually puts RDF back on my “day job” list (one can dream)…

It’s also nice that Holger took the pain to deliver SPIN not just as a feature of his product but also as a stand-alone specification, which should make it pretty easy for anyone who has a SPARQL engine handy to support it. Hopefully the next step will be for him to clarify the IP terms for the specification and to decide whether or not he wants to eventually submit it for standardization. Maybe to the W3C SML working group? :-) I’d have a hard time resisting joining if he did
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Comments

William Vambenepe replied on Wed, 2009/01/14 - 1:01pm

For those interested in SPIN, I would recommend reading the comment that Holger left on the original version of this article on my blog. He provides more information and links to a lot more information about SPIN.

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