Cloud Zone is brought to you in partnership with:

Pascal is a senior JEE Developer and Architect at 4Synergy in The Netherlands. Pascal has been designing and building J2EE applications since 2001. He is particularly interested in Open Source toolstack (Mule, Spring Framework, JBoss) and technologies like Web Services, SOA and Cloud technologies. Specialties: JEE XML Web Services Mule ESB Maven Cloud Technology Pascal is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 56 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Running Oracle XE on Amazon EC2

02.08.2013
| 2693 views |
  • submit to reddit
A few weeks ago it was this time again. For development of a certain Mule ESB flow I needed an Oracle database to test a JDBC Transport enhancement to obtain OUT parameters from a stored procedure. As soon as this happens I install an Oracle XE database which doesn’t take to much time so I can proceed with the work I really have to do. However sine a couple of years I am using my Mac for development (and loving it) and as you might know there is no Oracle XE release that runs on a Mac.
What I used to do is to instantiate a Debian instance as a VMWare guest and install XE on that. Unfortunately I tend too loose these VMWare images if I don’t use them for 3 months or so. So that brought me to the idea to just run the database on a server in the cloud. If I can use a micro instance from Amazon for that it shouldn’t cost too much.
At first I hoped for a community AMI to be available to install. Unfortunately this isn’t the case, most likely because of license agreement that you have to accept when you download XE. Luckily I found this article explaining all steps. I went through it step by step and now have my own XE instance running in the cloud. Of course I also created a (private) AMI of it so I can terminate this instance when the project is over and recreate a new one if I might need it again in the future.
By the way two step I did slightly different. First instead of using the certificates on the Amazon Linux host I made use of the ACCESS_KEY and SECRET_KEY by adding these to the ‘.bash_profile like’ this:
export AWS_ACCESS_KEY=***
export AWS_SECRET_KEY=****
Secondly I performed the following SQL statement to open up the APEX administration console from access different then ‘localhost’:
 EXEC DBMS_XDB.SETLISTENERLOCALACCESS(FALSE);
So now I am the lucky developer with an Oracle instance in the cloud which will always be there if I need it :-)




 

Published at DZone with permission of Pascal Alma, author and DZone MVB. (source)

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)