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Steve Smith is an Agile consultant and Continuous Delivery specialist at Always Agile Consulting Ltd. An XP / Lean developer with 10+ years of experience in enterprise software development in Britain and New Zealand, Steve favours practices such as Pair Programming and Test-Driven Development to build quality into software products. As an early adopter of Continuous Delivery he has overseen transformation programmes in multiple organisations to reduce lead times and increase product revenues. Steve is a co-author of the Continuous Delivery and DevOps book "Build Quality In", a co-organiser of the monthly London Continuous Delivery meetup group, a co-organiser of the annual PIPELINE conference, and a regular speaker at conferences such as Agile On The Beach and QCon New York. Steve blogs at Always Agile Consulting and is on Twitter at @AgileSteveSmith. Steve is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 29 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

QCon NY 2013: Continuous Delivery in New York

07.01.2013
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I recently had the honour of speaking at QCon New York in Dave Farley’s Continuous Delivery track, and was excited to find a real appetite for Continuous Delivery in New York.

Dave set the scene by talking about Continuous Delivery processes and technology, highlighting the value of cycle time as a metric and outlining how to implement a pipeline. Dave used the LMAX pipeline as an example of how automation and collaboration can be woven into the fabric of an organisation.

I followed up with how to win over hearts and minds for Continuous Delivery, describing how organisational change is a prerequisite for success. I provided a series of real-world examples on how to encourage a Continuous Delivery mindset, and how to establish an optimal cycle time strategy.

Eric Minick then discussed a Continuous Delivery maturity model, using IMVU Continuous Deployment to illustrate the gulf between industry current practice and industry best practice. Eric talked about orchestration challenges and how a maturity model can guide the adoption of best practices.

Wil Stuckey spoke about how Continuous Delivery enables continuous experimentation at Etsy, with 30+ daily production releases facilitating a culture of Validated Learning. Wil described how Etsy uses an in-house feature toggle engine to continuously perform A/B testing, and grow product revenues as a result.

Finally, Graham Brooks covered feedback-based evolutionary design in Continuous Delivery. Graham talked about the historical shift from Big Design Up Front toDesign Is Code, the inherent value of compressing the Build-Deploy-Test cycle, and how Continuous Delivery encourages reinforcing feedback.

While the quality of presentations and conversations in the track was exceptional throughout, Wil’s talk on driving product revenues via continuous experimentation validated the Continuous Delivery value proposition and should be mandatory viewing for anyone with an interest in rapidly releasing software.

Published at DZone with permission of Steve Smith, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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