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An Overview of NoSQL from Neo4j

07.12.2013
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This 10-minute presentation covers some emerging NoSQL categories, including Key-Value stores and ColmnFamily / BigTable clones.

Overview of NoSQL from Neo Technology on Vimeo.

Published at DZone with permission of its author, Eric Genesky.

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)

Comments

Andy Jefferson replied on Fri, 2013/07/12 - 3:17am

Perhaps DZone could take a look at the first page of that presentation themselves, and note that NOSQL has a capital O and is an acronym for "Not Only SQL" (and update their articles/tags accordingly), and not "No SQL". Both are stupid names, but slanting it as "No SQL" is particularly misleading, especially so if you're trying to educate people.

Mitch Pronschinske replied on Fri, 2013/07/12 - 7:29am in response to: Andy Jefferson

Anyone who's in the development and IT space needs to be aware that there are plenty of buzzwords in this industry and they can't just rely on what a word looks like on the surface.  The staff at DZone are aware that NoSQL doesn't necessarily mean "no use of the SQL language in this database".  But NOSQL as an abbreviation just hasn't caught on as thoroughly as the original buzzword.  Another major site about NoSQL also has the lower case "o" right there in the title: http://nosql.mypopescu.com/   We certainly want bloggers to use whatever acronym they prefer, and we won't modify that, but here we've made a decision to stick with the common standard.  Perhaps we could work together on an article to further explore this topic?  You can get in touch with DZone's editorial staff at curators[at]dzone[dot]com.

Mark Unknown replied on Mon, 2013/07/15 - 10:39am

I would like to have seen where relational DBs fell within the speed/complexity chart.

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