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Robin Bramley is a hands-on Architect who has spent the last decade working with Java, mobile & Open Source across sectors including Financial Services & High Growth / start-ups. Prior to that he helped UK Police Forces with MIS /reporting & intelligence systems. He has contributed to a wide variety of Open Source projects including adding Open ID support to Spring Security. Robin is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 23 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Monitoring MarkLogic

01.20.2013
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This is a quick how-to post for Opsview users who have a need to monitor MarkLogic.

The good news is that MarkLogic have released a Nagios plugin.

The reference manual is available from http://developer.marklogic.com/pubs/5.0/books/monitoring.pdf (see chapter 3 for Nagios specifics) and the plugin itself from http://developer.marklogic.com/download/binaries/nagios/MarkLogic-Nagios-Plugin-1.0-1.tar

Installing the plugin

You’ll only need to follow the first 3 steps of section 3.4 of the Monitoring MarkLogic Guide, in essence:

  1. Unzip the plugin tar
  2. Copy/move check_marklogic.pl to /usr/local/nagios/libexec
  3. chmod +x check_marklogic.pl

Setting up a service check

Once the plugin has been installed we can define service checks, Figure 1 shows two simple examples (using a clean install of MarkLogic plus the Hadoop Connector – maybe a topic for another blog post?).

Figure 1 – Simple MarkLogic check definitions

You would normally want to set up finer-grained service checks with thresholds – consequently the plugin accepts additional arguments (but doesn’t support the de facto help argument) to specify keys (-k), warning (-w) and critical (-c) thresholds. Note that the thresholds can use an operator (-op) argument. These arguments are fully detailed in section 3.5.2.3 of the Monitoring MarkLogic Guide.

Checks in action

Figure 2 shows the host-level view of the service checks, with the detail of the performance data behind them shown in Figures 3 and 4.

Figure 2 – MarkLogic service check summaries

Figure 3 – Document count service check detailed results

Figure 4 – Status service check detailed results

There you go, quick and easy basic monitoring of MarkLogic.

Published at DZone with permission of Robin Bramley, author and DZone MVB.

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)