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Sean Hull is a renowned author, speaker and advisor on MySQL & Oracle databases, web performance and scalability, EC2, Linux & Internet Architecture. He is the author of "Oracle & Open Source" O'Reilly, 2001, and speaks widely at conferences and forums. With 20 years of professional experience, he consults with large enterprises and startups in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area. Sean is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 64 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Book: PHP and MongoDB Web Development

04.03.2012
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What makes a beginner’s guide handy is when it speaks to your intuition. It anticipates the burning questions that follow from a newbie trying to grasp new concepts and it quickly answers them. PHP and MongoDB Web Development – Beginner’s Guide is one such guide.

I hadn’t heard of Packt Publishing or Rubayeet Islam before picking up this title and I must say I’m impressed. Based in Birmingham, with offices in Mumbai, part of Packt’s business model is to give part of the royalties earned from its books to the open source projects they cover.

I already had a working knowledge of MongoDB, mostly from an operational perspective. If you are new to MongoDB you’ll certainly appreciate how this book is structured. it cuts to the chase, diving right into the nuts and bolts of installing the pieces you’ll need such as database and drivers, and getting your first application running.

From there they take you through a basic web application step-by-step, with chapters on session management, MapReduce and GridFS. EVery time I flip through the pages of a technical book, I find I always have questions in the background; ‘what about performance?’ or ‘How do I troubleshoot these pieces as I’m building them?’

What I liked about this book is that almost as quickly as I’d formulate some question about performance, I’d happen upon answers in the book, as if it knew what would come to my mind at each point of the

I was thinking about tuning and application performance and then found chapter 9 which discusses MongoDB’s explain facility, similar to that of MySQL. From there they cover index creation, hints, and finally profiling. These are all important topics for a developer, ones that he or she should have in mind while building their applications. So I was happy to see good coverage of that even in a self-avowed beginners’ guide.

Building apps that talk to both MySQL and MongoDB

Another interesting chapter was one introducing the idea of building an application that can talk to both MySQL and MongoDB and using those two datastores for different purposes. Again while I’m reading it I start thinking about operational concerns, and I start asking how one would support such an architecture. And then just like clockwork, Islam answers that very question.

He explains the challenges around data consistency and operational support in detail. It’s a great way to introduce a topic without necessarily pushing that adoption per se. Islam is clearly an experienced programmer, with much reasoned advice to share.

The book had great utility but I do have a few complaints.

First off the font is a little funky, and hard to read after a while. In that same vein, some of the screenshots are very wide and as such were zoomed down. This made those tiny and not very readable. Also the screenshots aren’t really consistent, some are black on white and some white text on black terminal which ended up being impossible to read.

Lastly I would have liked to see more use case discussions. Particularly, when should I consider a NoSQL database like MongoDB over a relational database? Which types of applications are really well suited? Which aren’t? What about versus other NoSQL’s? The same with GridFS. There was some caution there after the material was introduced but more discussion about what applications it is well suited for would be useful.

Those few complaints aside, the book is overall very good and perhaps the publishers will consider improving the type and diagrams in the next edition. It definitely sticks to it’s cover page motto “Learn by doing: less theory, more results”.

Published at DZone with permission of Sean Hull, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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